Yearly Archives: 2011

EFiberTools Introduces the AV6416 Palm OTDR

The AV6416 PalmOTDR offers top-of-the-line features at an affordable price.  

AV6416 Single-Mode Palm OTDR

AV6416 Single-Mode Palm OTDR

Phoenix, AZ December 20, 2011 The AV6416 is one of the lowest cost Palm OTDRs currently on the market and found at eFiberTools.com. But don’t let the low cost fool you. According to the manufacturer, this handheld OTDR is designed for FTTH, installation and maintenance applications, R&D and testing. This unit has a reasonably short dead zone of 1.6m. It displays accurate of cable length, and displays the loss through connectors and fusion splices, as well as other typical physical characteristics of optical fiber cable. The AV6416 has proven very popular with technicians in the field and at the factory. Feedback on the units features and functions have been most positive. Readings are reliable, consistent and accurate. The low-cost and the valuable features have made the AV6416 popular amongst many technicians. Manufactured with a touch-screen in a handheld device provides high-end ergonomic portability at an affordable price The AV6416 shares much of the look and feel of some EXFO OTDRs, but at a lower price point. At several recent fiber optic expos the company claims many of the attendees walking by their exhibition booth expressed surprise to find this of blue handheld OTDR was in fact an AV6416 and was not manufactured by EXFO. Rugged design with a rubberized protective sheath the AV6416 is lightweight and easy to operate. The low reflection LCD screen is uncomplicated to read and understand. Data is accessed using two USB interfaces to transfer traces easily and conveniently. The battery life is more than 10 hours of use time using rechargeable NiCad batteries Built-in features include an auto testing mode which makes OTDR Measurement at eFiberTools.com simple and intelligent. This mode automatically evaluates the fiber optic cable length, sets the test parameters, and performs acquisitions and displays event tables and traces. Installed software operates on Microsoft Windows CE. It supports Bellcore GR196 and is equipped with VFL (visual fault locator) function. This feature is outstanding in checking jumpers and short fibers. The connectors on top of the unit are removable. Visit the following pages for similar OTDR with additional features see multimode OTDR see the AV6413, and for other new and quality used OTDRs. ABOUT EFIBERTOOLS.COM EFiberTools.com is a global distributor and reseller and has always strived to offer better value in fiber optic tools and supplies by looking around the world for the best quality products at the best prices. Only products that need eFiberTools.com’s demanding criteria are offered to their customers With the largest inventory of new and refurbished OTDRs and other optical test equipment, fusion splicers, and optical fiber cable and connectivity products, eFiberTools.com is committed to the fiber optic installer, manufacturer, FTTH and OSP contractor, maintenance engineer and others who want quality fiber of the products at fair and reasonable prices. Expedited shipping is available and ship worldwide. EFiberTools.com is located at 329 W. Melinda Ln., Phoenix Arizona 85027, and open Monday through Friday from 7:30 am to 4:00 pm. Visit their recently rebuilt e-commerce website at http://www.efibertools.com. Stay informed of new products and specials by adding your email address to their targeted mailing list. Contact eFiberTools.com about OTDR and fusion splicer rental, to trade or sell equipment, and information on the popular Inno Instrument IFS-10 fusion splicer at info(at)efibertools(dot)com. For news and information on fusion splicers, fiber splicing, optical test, and fiber optic networks and more, visit the eFiberTools.com expert blog at http://www.FusionSplicers.org.

Inno Video

[iframe src=”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhKuDhkiyyY”]

eFiberTools.com Introduces the Inno IFS-10 Fusion Splicer

Just released, ‘The Fiber Master‘, Inno Instrument IFS-10 core-alignment fusion splicer.

Phoenix, AZ, Nov. 29, 2011 – EFiberTools.com introduces the Inno Instrument IFS-10 fiber optic fusion splicer. With a price tag of only $9990, the IFS-10 is easily the best value in a new core-alignment fusion splicer. This price is for the complete splicing kit, including VF-78 cleaver, heavy-duty case, battery, charger, cables, user documentation and software, plus an exclusive 2-year limited warranty with US service and support.

Inno Intrument IFS-10 Fusion Splicer

Inno IFS-10 Fusion Splicer Kits, Price $9,990.00 /Kit

Called The Fiber Master, the IFS-10 fusion splicer is manufactured in South Korea and uses core alignment technology. At only around 4.5 lbs the IFS-10 is designed for high-precision splicing applications, harsh weather conditions, includes a friendly GUI with intuitive menu options, 350x splice capacity with its lithium batteries, upgradable software using USB, and a feature not common with the better-known splicers,  bi-directional viewing which allows the monitor to be positioned in front or rear. See user’s manual for the IFS-10 on this blog. Don’t confuse the Inno with the splicers made in China. The IFS-10 is far superior with well-designed features and built solid enough for any field application and with the dual-directional monitor easy to use indoors on a lab bench. The Inno IFS-10 has been called the “Best Fusion Splicer” on the market today, and without being gouged on price. South Korea has become known more for quality electronic and other products and the Inno IFS-10 is more evidence of this. The IFS-9 was the first splicer model from Inno but the company chose to wait until they perfected the IFS-10 before introducing it to the US and the “demanding” US customer. EFiberTools.com is the only distributor currently with stock on hand. All repairs are done in their Phoenix, AZ location by factory trained technicians. Generous credits are available for fusion splicer trade-ins of working and many non-working units, on a case-by-case basis. Contact eFiberTools for details at purchasing@efibertools.com. Dealers wanted! EFiberTools can sell both retail and wholesale to fiber optic and cabling suppliers and is currently looking for resellers and manufacturer reps to market Inno products and help get the word out. Drop-shipping is offered to recognized businesses. Special discounts are available to fiber optic training schools and other educational organizations.  Quantity discounts are also available. Anyone interested in the Inno fusion splicers or cleavers should contact eFiberTools.com at sales@efibertools.com. Finally, US customers have a choice. The Inno IFS-10 is the first fusion splicer to hit the US market truly ready to compete against the long-held dominance of Fujikura, Fitel, Sumitomo, and Corning and is a direct replacement to the best-selling model, Fujikura FSM-60s fusion splicer. Pricing for the 60s is controlled by AFL, which is owned by Fujikura. As more customers realize that the 60s price is based on a monopolistic pricing scheme in the US and not on the quality of their products, then more customers will consider other brands. The Inno IFS-10 fusion splicer is as good or better than the FSM-60s in every way and is priced 40% lower. That’s $6000 less! The Inno IFS-10 fusion splicing kit comes with a money-back guarantee from eFiberTools.com if you are not fully satisfied, no questions asked. Dealers are wanted so contact the eFiberTools’ sales department for details. Drop-shipping is available for recognized resellers. Contact:  sales@eFiberTools.com

Grey Market Fiber Splicing & Optical Test Products

The intent of this article is an attempt to provide a solid description of the term “gray-market” as it applies to fusion splicers. Gray-market sales by definition are legal. This is contrary however to what a plaintiff in a legal matter will wish others to believe. In my opinion, what should be illegal is a company’s–usually the manufacturer– ability to price gouge one group of customers simply due to where they happen live, as well as how strong is the manufacturer’s monopoly. The strength of the monopoly is proportionate to the country’s legal system, primarily in the area of law relating to trademarks. This appears to be the case cents a significant number of cases filed appears from my perspective to be based on a trademark violation. The products manufacturer or the regions alleged authorized distributors are the ones most likely to start the action. According to Wikipedia a grey market or gray market also known as parallel market is the trade of a commodity through distribution channels which, while legal, are unofficial, unauthorized, or unintended by the original manufacturer. A black market is the trade of goods and services that are illegal in themselves and/or distributed through illegal channels, such as the selling of stolen goods, certain drugs or unregistered handguns. The two main types of grey market are imported manufactured goods that would normally be unavailable or more expensive in a certain country. Unlike black market goods, grey-market goods are legal. However, they are sold outside normal distribution channels by companies which may have no relationship with the producer of the goods. Frequently this form of parallel import occurs when the price of an item is significantly higher in one country than another. This situation commonly occurs with electronic equipment such as cameras. Entrepreneurs buy the product where it is available cheaply, often at retail but sometimes at wholesale, and import it legally to the target market. They then sell it at a price high enough to provide a profit but under the normal market price. International efforts to promote free trade, including reduced tariffs and harmonized national standards, facilitate this form of arbitrage whenever manufacturers attempt to preserve highly disparate pricing. Grey-market goods are often new, but some grey market goods are used goods. A market in used goods is sometimes nicknamed a Green Market. A related concept is bootlegging, the smuggling or transport of highly regulated goods, especially alcoholic beverages. The term “bootlegging” is also often applied to the production or distribution of counterfeit or otherwise infringing goods. Grey markets can sometimes develop for select video game consoles and titles whose demand temporarily outstrips supply and the local shops run out of stock, this happens especially during the holiday season. Other popular items, such as dolls can also be affected. In such situations the grey market price may be considerably higher than the manufacturer’s suggested retail price. Online auction sites such as eBay have contributed to the emergence of the video game grey market. The parties most concerned with the grey market are usually the authorized agents or importers, or the retailers of the item in the target market. Often this is the national subsidiary of the manufacturer, or a related company. In response to the resultant damage to their profits and reputation, manufacturers and their official distribution chain will often seek to restrict the grey market. Such responses can breach competition law, particularly in the European Union. Manufacturers or their licensees often seek to enforce trademark or other intellectual-property rights against the grey market. Such rights may be exercised against the import, sale and/or advertisement of grey imports. In 2002, Levi Strauss, after a 4-year legal fight, prevented UK supermarket Tesco from selling grey market jeans.[4] However, such rights can be limited. Examples of such limitations include the first-sale doctrine in the United States and the doctrine of the exhaustion of rights in the European Union. When grey-market products are advertised on Google, eBay or other legitimate web sites, it is possible to petition for removal of any advertisements that violate trademark or copyright laws. This can be done directly, without the involvement of legal professionals. eBay, for example, will remove listings of such products even in countries where their purchase and use is not against the law. Manufacturers may refuse to supply distributors and retailers (and with commercial products, customers) that trade in grey-market goods. They may also more broadly limit supplies in markets where prices are low. Manufacturers may refuse to honor the warranty of an item purchased from grey-market sources, on the grounds that the higher price on the non-grey market reflects a higher level of service even though the manufacturer does of course control their own prices to distributors. Alternatively, they may provide the warranty service only from the manufacturer’s subsidiary in the intended country of import, not the diverted third country where the grey goods are ultimately sold by the distributor or retailer. This response to the grey market is especially evident in electronics goods Manufacturers may give the same item different model numbers in different countries, even though the functions of the item are identical, so that they can identify grey imports. Manufacturers can also use batch codes to enable similar tracing of grey imports. Parallel market importers often de-code the product in order to avoid the identification of the supplier. In the United States, courts have decided that decoding which blemishes the product is a material alteration, rendering the product infringed. Parallel market importers have worked around this limitation by developing new removal techniques. The development of DVD region codes, and equivalent regional-lockout techniques in other media, are examples of technological features designed to limit the flow of goods between national markets, effectively fighting the grey market that would otherwise develop. This enables movie studios and other content creators to charge more for the same product in one market than in another or alternatively withhold the product from some markets for a particular time. Consumer advocacy groups argue that this discrimination against consumers—the charging of higher prices on the same object simply because of where they happen to live—is unjust and anti-competitive. Since it requires governments to legislate to prevent their citizens from purchasing goods at cheaper prices from other markets, and since this is clearly not in their citizens’ interests, many governments in democratic countries have chosen not to protect anti-competitive technologies such as DVD region-coding. The above was taken in part from Wikipedia’s definition of gray market. This posting will be edited over time to conform more specifically to fusion splicers and other fiber optic and optical products.

The Grey-Market and Fujikura Fusion Splicers

The intent of this article is an attempt to provide a solid description of what the term “gray-market” does and does not mean. Gray-market sales by definition are legal. This is contrary however to what a plaintiff in a legal matter will wish others to believe. In my opinion, what should illegal is a company’s–usually the manufacturer– ability to price gouge one group of customers simply due to where they happen live, as well as how strong is the manufacturer’s monopoly. The strength of the monopoly is proportionate to the country’s legal system, primarily in the area of law relating to trademarks. This appears to be the case cents a significant number of cases filed appears from my perspective to be based on a trademark violation. The products manufacturer or the regions alleged authorized distributors are the ones most likely to start the action. According to Wikipedia a grey market or gray market also known as parallel market is the trade of a commodity through distribution channels which, while legal, are unofficial, unauthorized, or unintended by the original manufacturer. A black market is the trade of goods and services that are illegal in themselves and/or distributed through illegal channels, such as the selling of stolen goods, certain drugs or unregistered handguns. The two main types of grey market are imported manufactured goods that would normally be unavailable or more expensive in a certain country. Unlike black market goods, grey-market goods are legal. However, they are sold outside normal distribution channels by companies which may have no relationship with the producer of the goods. Frequently this form of parallel import occurs when the price of an item is significantly higher in one country than another. This situation commonly occurs with electronic equipment such as cameras. Entrepreneurs buy the product where it is available cheaply, often at retail but sometimes at wholesale, and import it legally to the target market. They then sell it at a price high enough to provide a profit but under the normal market price. International efforts to promote free trade, including reduced tariffs and harmonized national standards, facilitate this form of arbitrage whenever manufacturers attempt to preserve highly disparate pricing. Grey-market goods are often new, but some grey market goods are used goods. A market in used goods is sometimes nicknamed a Green Market. A related concept is bootlegging, the smuggling or transport of highly regulated goods, especially alcoholic beverages. The term “bootlegging” is also often applied to the production or distribution of counterfeit or otherwise infringing goods. Grey markets can sometimes develop for select video game consoles and titles whose demand temporarily outstrips supply and the local shops run out of stock, this happens especially during the holiday season. Other popular items, such as dolls can also be affected. In such situations the grey market price may be considerably higher than the manufacturer’s suggested retail price. Online auction sites such as eBay have contributed to the emergence of the video game grey market. The parties most concerned with the grey market are usually the authorized agents or importers, or the retailers of the item in the target market. Often this is the national subsidiary of the manufacturer, or a related company. In response to the resultant damage to their profits and reputation, manufacturers and their official distribution chain will often seek to restrict the grey market. Such responses can breach competition law, particularly in the European Union. Manufacturers or their licensees often seek to enforce trademark or other intellectual-property rights against the grey market. Such rights may be exercised against the import, sale and/or advertisement of grey imports. In 2002, Levi Strauss, after a 4-year legal fight, prevented UK supermarket Tesco from selling grey market jeans.[4] However, such rights can be limited. Examples of such limitations include the first-sale doctrine in the United States and the doctrine of the exhaustion of rights in the European Union. When grey-market products are advertised on Google, eBay or other legitimate web sites, it is possible to petition for removal of any advertisements that violate trademark or copyright laws. This can be done directly, without the involvement of legal professionals. eBay, for example, will remove listings of such products even in countries where their purchase and use is not against the law. Manufacturers may refuse to supply distributors and retailers (and with commercial products, customers) that trade in grey-market goods. They may also more broadly limit supplies in markets where prices are low. Manufacturers may refuse to honor the warranty of an item purchased from grey-market sources, on the grounds that the higher price on the non-grey market reflects a higher level of service even though the manufacturer does of course control their own prices to distributors. Alternatively, they may provide the warranty service only from the manufacturer’s subsidiary in the intended country of import, not the diverted third country where the grey goods are ultimately sold by the distributor or retailer. This response to the grey market is especially evident in electronics goods Manufacturers may give the same item different model numbers in different countries, even though the functions of the item are identical, so that they can identify grey imports. Manufacturers can also use batch codes to enable similar tracing of grey imports. Parallel market importers often de-code the product in order to avoid the identification of the supplier. In the United States, courts have decided that decoding which blemishes the product is a material alteration, rendering the product infringed. Parallel market importers have worked around this limitation by developing new removal techniques. The development of DVD region codes, and equivalent regional-lockout techniques in other media, are examples of technological features designed to limit the flow of goods between national markets, effectively fighting the grey market that would otherwise develop. This enables movie studios and other content creators to charge more for the same product in one market than in another or alternatively withhold the product from some markets for a particular time. Consumer advocacy groups argue that this discrimination against consumers—the charging of higher prices on the same object simply because of where they happen to live—is unjust and anti-competitive. Since it requires governments to legislate to prevent their citizens from purchasing goods at cheaper prices from other markets, and since this is clearly not in their citizens’ interests, many governments in democratic countries have chosen not to protect anti-competitive technologies such as DVD region-coding. The above was taken in part from Wikipedia’s definition of gray market. This posting will be edited over time to conform more specifically to fusion splicers and other fiber optic and optical products.  

INNO Instrument IFS-10 Brochure

Newest core-alignment fusion splicer from INNO Instrument. The Fiber Master model IFS-10 has the price/value of all other models. As good or better than the Fujikura 60s but at a 40% lower price! BEST FUSION SPLICER without a doubt. Best sales and support at a lot lower price. Only $9,990 which includes a two-year limited warranty. Finally a fair price to the Japanese brand price-gouging of US customers.   [pdf issuu_pdf_id=”111103030115-2e2620db0d2c435b828dc4baaf30a891″]  

 

INNO IFS-10 User Manual

Best fusion splicer on the market. The INNO IFS-10 fusion splicer from INNO Instrument.   [pdf issuu_pdf_id=”111103030754-44a92366ea8b43b4be201b033fdde369″]  

 

INNO Fusion Splicer

The newest core-alignment fusion splicer to hit the US market is the INNO IFS-10 fusion splicer kit. Called The Fiber Master the IFS-10 is manufactured by INNO Instruments in Korea. This is the second Koran model we’ve tested this year that can be considered to be a true competitor to Fujikura’s dominance in the fusion splicer market, at least for single fiber splicers. The INNO is well-designed and manufactured. But not only is the INNO IFS-10 everything Fujikura is known for, including accuracy and reliability, but finally a truly quality core-alignment fusion splicer can now be purchased in the United States  for under $10k, and without resorting to the gray-market*. For the last month we have done extensive testing of the IFS-10 splicer and found it to be as good and better than the much higher priced** Fujikura FSM-60s. Without a doubt this is the best value fusion splicer you will find. For the last couple decades products coming out of Korea have gotten better overall. The other Koren fusion manufacturer, Ilsintech, makes a good product but unfortunately they have chosen somewhat to follow the Japanese-model with regard to pricing. For instance, the Fujikura FSM-60s is at this point in time, the best-selling fusion splicer in the US. However, few people understand that although AFL, which is wholly owned by Fujikura Ltd in Japan, currently sets the retail price of the 60s at $16,250, yet you can buy the exact same model in much of the world for only $8300. So this $8300 product is systematically sold for double the price in the US. Why is this? Well, it turns out the AFL is wholly owned by Fujikura Ltd the manufacturer and together they conspire to charge US customers double the price   . .. good or better than any other single-fiber, core-alignment splicer but with one huge difference, a retail price of only $9990. Never has this price been available in the US market for a splicer truly ready for the demanding US customers. The current leaders in the US are Fujikura, Fitel and Sumitomo. Each is manufactured in Japan and each unfortunately is grossly overpriced.   *The gray market for fusion splicers only exists for Fujikura brand and the other Japanese models due to these companies charging up to twice the price in to US customers than they charge for the exact same model in other countries. As long as a customer can spend $6000 or more on these splicers it’s hard to blame anyone for purchasing them. It’s important to note that for some reason we are not aware of there is only one model splicer from each of the Japanese manufacturers Fujikura, Fitel and Sumitomo which are generally sold on the gray market. The prices of ribbon, clad alignment and other splicers is a little lower outside the US but only up to 20%, and usually less. Why these companies have chosen to gauge US customers can logically be attributed to greed. Hopefully with strong competitors like the Korean manufacturers this may change someday. US business can no longer afford to pay twice as much as often their competitors overseas are paying and still stay competitive. Myself, once I find a company has a history of taking advantage of its customers I try to avoid that manufacturers as much as possible.

Fusion Splicer Electrode Replacement

When should you replace the electrodes on your splicer?  Manufactures provide guidelines in their manuals when the electrodes should be replaced.  Some  splicers also give a warning message when the splicer is turned on. Sometimes the arc counts get reset by accident and the user may not remember the arc count value.  Looking into the memory for the splice data may not be of any values since the memory may not store all of the splices due to memory storage limitations.

Electrodes of Major Brands

After having serviced numerous splicers I have found that the best way is to see how the previous splices have been performing.  If consecutive splices have resulted in higher estimated splice loss, when the fibers have been properly prepared for splicing, listening to the arc during the splice operation may give some indication of an arc problem.  There should be no sputtering sounds heard from under the wind protector cover. Some splicers have an electrode conditioning process built into the maintenance program that can clean and condition the electrodes.  Electrodes can be coated with fused deposits from the splicing process that cannot be removed by the electrode cleaning procedures. They can still be reconditioned by careful cleaning.  As long as the tip is still at a point and not bent, the electrode may still be able to provide many good splices.  If the electrode is bent at the tip, or the tip is rounded, they will need to be replaced.  The electrode length is very important for good low loss splicing.  Decreasing electrode length will cause the arc voltage to go higher causing strain on the power supply and creating an unstable arc.  This can cause  errors such as bubble or thin to appear after the splice.  If you need to replace the electrodes,  we have a good supply of electrodes and very good pricing.  Contact sales@efibertools.com.

Before and After Cleaning ... (click to enlarge)

  The figures to the right are pictures taken through a microscope of an electrode from a FSM-60S splicer.  The top picture is a view of the electrode before cleaning. See the buildup of deposits on the tip of the electrode.  The tip is still pointed and not bent.  Take a piece of emery paper and fold it into a “V” pocket in one hand. With the other hand, insert the electrode into it and begin rotating the electrode several times.   See the bottom figure for an after view of the cleaned electrode. After cleaning the electrode and before re-installing, perform an arc stabilization/calibration then begin splicing the fibers again.

Fujikura FSM-60s User Manual

User manual for Fujikura 60s fusion splicer.   [pdf issuu_pdf_id=”111103023610-c4bdba027ee64a2d9e6f98fb689e5124″]